In The News

8 Kid- and Parent-Approved Eateries in Park City

By ParkCityIs.com
Feb 13, 2019

Kid-friendly menus, fast service, and a casual atmosphere prevail at these family-friendly restaurants.

By Michaela Wagner 12/17/2018 at 4:21pm

Casual atmosphere, a menu with lots of variety, and craft beer make Wasatch a winner for the whole family. IMAGE: AUSTEN DIAMOND

Baja Cantina

It might not be the most authentic Mexican food, but Baja Cantina (1355 Lowell Ave) is a no-brainer for après-ski munchies or dinner, particularly if you’re looking for a convenient location near Park City Mountain’s base area. Load up on generous portions of chips, salsa, tacos, and other Tex-Mex specials—and for the adults, margaritas, of course.

The Corner Store Pub & Grill

Unwind after a day on the slopes at a longtime local fixture. You’ll always find a mix of visitors and local regulars partaking in the après scene at The Corner Store (1325 Lowell Ave) thanks to $3 PBRs and tasty, reasonably-priced grub. During their round of renovations this summer, the eatery installed two new pizza ovens meaning those $6 slices ($4 for locals) are being served faster than ever. The joint also gets bonus points for prime people-watching patio seating, perfect for those sunnier winter days.

Davanza’s

If you’ve got a mind to skip out on the pricey fare of the mountain and you’re at least an intermediate skier or rider, cruise down Quit-N-Time run at Park City Mountain and pop into Davanza’s (690 Park Ave, 435.649.222). With walls lined with hundreds of beer cans, this down-to-earth Park City hangout serves up burgers, subs, street tacos, and pizza on the cheap. Hop back on Town Lift and you’re ready for more action.

Red Tail Grill

Just steps from Park City Mountain’s Orange Bubble Express, the Red Tail Grill(4000 Canyons Resort Dr) offers fantastic views of the slopes with your lunch or dinner. Their special kid’s menu includes no-fuss cheese burgers, spaghetti, and chicken fingers, while adults can choose from a more sophisticated selection of entrées, hand-crafted cocktails, and draft beers.

Wasatch Brew Pub

Most restaurants on Main Street do their best to accommodate families with kids. But, if we have to pick the best place for a family outing, Wasatch Brew Pub (250 Main St) is it. With a long list of award-winning beers and a food menu that covers everything from tater-tots and loaded mac-n-cheese to seared ahi tuna, superfood salads, and savory burgers, this restaurant has something to tickle everyone’s fancy.

Squatters Roadhouse & Grill

Another excellent choice (just ask our editor’s kids!) for a laid-back dining experience is Squatters Roadhouse & Grill (1900 Park Avenue). Serving breakfast, lunch, or dinner, Squatters expansive menu offers a little bit of everything, from biscuits and gravy to tacos, curry, pizza, burgers, and beyond.

Daly’s Pub & Rec

Located inside the Montage Deer Valley, Daly’s Pub & Rec (9100 Marsac Ave) is a winner for all ages. This upscale-pub-meets-tricked-out-game-room offers guests a little competition with their meal through vintage arcade games, shuffleboard, bowling, and darts. Menu items range from kid-pleasers like chicken tenders and mac-n-cheese to artisanal pizzas, Wagyu steak, wild mushroom risotto, and salads.

Champions Club

Part of this summer’s $14 million property enhancements, Stein Eriksen Lodge (7700 Stein Way) recently unveiled the shiny new 3,500-square foot Champions Club. The entertainment center—with high-tech interactive games as well as retro arcade favorites—offers a casual, family-friendly place to grab a bite and beverage. Best of all, you can ski in and ski out easily from the adjacent Champions Club Plaza. Parents may opt for sidling up to the plaza’s fire pits with a glass of vino, while the rest of the clan heads into the club for billiards or, perhaps, Pac-Man.

Selling your home this winter?

By ParkCityIs.com
Feb 11, 2019

Don’t forget these 5 tips.

Posted on Dec 21 2017 - 12:45pm by Housecall

By Dixie Somers

Can’t wait until spring to sell your home? Winter can be a tough time to attract buyers, particularly if you live in a region where there’s going to be ice and snow all around. Your home may not show as well in bad weather; however, it is possible. Here are some winter real estate facts to keep in mind:

People Like an Orderly Property 

In the winter, all visitors may see is a blanket of snow (depending on where you live). Do your best to keep the driveway and walkways neatly cleared and free of ice. Even if there’s just a light dusting of snow, sweep it away. Spread some sand over walkways to avoid slips and falls. Try to keep the roof clear of snow, as well, as a good roof is important to selling any home. You can always call in a roofing company if yours isn’t up to par.

Bright Light Is Cheery

There's nothing that makes a house cheerier than sunlight. Wash the windows inside and out so they sparkle. Pull up the blinds and throw back the drapes for some warming illumination. In darker corners and niches where the sun won’t reach, place a lamp and keep it on. You could also use spotlighting to illuminate major features of the kitchen, living room or bathroom.

Warmth Is Comfort

People coming in from the cold will be pleased to find your home is warm and toasty. As a retreat from winter cold, your buyers will have more of a reason to feel comfortable and take their time. You might consider lighting a small fire in the fireplace or wood stove to keep things toasty. Try to keep indoor humidity between 40-60 percent to avoid that dry, stuffy feeling.

Everyone Appreciates Mood

Create a cozy feel by adding extra pillows or afghans to the sofa and beds, or some plush throw rugs on the floor. Leave the dining room table set for dinner, along with a champagne bucket and a couple of glasses. Add some extra-fluffy towels or robes in the bathrooms. In short, make everything look comfortable and inviting.

Winter Can Be the Ideal Season

You’re more likely to get bids faster in the wintertime because you’re dealing with motivated buyers. They need to move, and soon, or they’d be waiting for the balmier temperatures of spring. You may get fewer visitors, but they’ll be serious buyers, not just frivolous house-shoppers. Stage your home well for the season and you may very well sell faster, and for a higher price, than you expected.

You always want to keep your home clean and in good repair, but the trick to selling in winter is creating the effect of a warm, sunny retreat from the elements.

The Top 4 Design Trends For 2019

By ParkCityIs.com
Feb 10, 2019

An important benefit of homeownership is that you can design and decorate your home to your tastes, but sometimes you need a few ideas to get started. Should you paint or wallpaper? Should you stay safe with neutrals or go wild with color? The answers may lie in these top trends for 2019.

Color Over Neutrals

This is the year to embrace color – reds, blues, greens, and yellows look terrific against a backdrop of black and white. Meanwhile, grays as neutrals have had their day.

Patterns

The global look of Ikat, Morrocan Trellis, and Shibori is giving way to large classical florals with a modern edge, including bohemian abstracts. Consider the lush wallpaper and fabric patterns of Timorous Beasties.

Style-Mixing

Mid-century modern and minimalistic decor have been hugely popular over the last few years, but now the styles are looking dated. One reason why is that to be most effective, they’re rarely mixed with other styles making a home look more like a museum. Feel free to mix furniture and accessories of compatible eras.  

Comfort

While metal, acrylics, and wood furniture look great, don’t be afraid to soften the edges. You’ll see sumptuous fabrics overlaying stuffed chairs and sofas.  Make your bedding inviting with plush duvets filled with lightweight down.

Other trends include one-of-a-kind artisan goods such as bronze sculpture, oil, acrylic, and mixed media paintings; lighter than darker wood floors, and accents of brass, pewter, and chrome. 

Whatever you choose, it’s your home, so enjoy!

Year End 2018 Market Overview

By ParkCityIs.com
Feb 08, 2019

 

The 2018 Year End Wasatch Back Market Overview is here. For the digital online version, go to https://joom.ag/FRga

20+ Things To Do In Park City This Winter ...

By ParkCityIs.com
Feb 07, 2019

20+ Things To Do In Park City This Winter That Have Nothing To Do With Skiing or Snowboarding

The slopes might be Park City’s calling card, but you don’t need to strap on a pair of skis or a snowboard to have a great time here.By Michaela Wagner  1/15/2018 at 8:32pm

 

IF YOU THINK Park City winters aren’t for you because you aren’t a skier or snowboarder, think again! Not only are there plenty of other ways to enjoy the snow, our little mountain town also offers a plethora of options for foodies, art connoisseurs, and anyone who just wants a bit of rest and relaxation. Don’t believe us? Just check out all these fun activities waiting for you.

Outdoors

Time-honored trail travel

There’s no better way to see Park City’s winter wonderland than by strapping into a pair of snowshoes. It’s a fun, easy, and economical winter sport to get into. You can rent a snowshoe set up (plus trekking poles) for as low as $18 a day from local retailers (Cole Sport, JANS Mountain Outfitters, and White Pine Touring) and strike out on the surrounding trails. If you don’t want to do the planning, no worries. Multiple outfitters offer tours with guides, including excursions across the local wetlands with the Swaner Preserve & EcoCenter. You’ll be surprised with what a good workout this almost 6,000-year old form of winter travel, so dress in light layers and don’t forget sunscreen and sunglasses on bluebird days.
Salchow sojourn 
No ski town would be complete without ice skating options. Gliding across the ice is an activity that can be enjoyed by people of all ages. For a dreamy outdoor experience, check out the cozy Resort Center Ice Rink (1415 Lowell Ave) in the middle of Park City Mountain’s base area or if you’d prefer to skate indoors, head over to larger sheet of ice at the Park City Ice Arena and Sports Complex (600 Gillmor Way, Quinn’s Junction). Other options include Basin Recreation’s neighborhood ice rink at Willow Creek Park and the city ice rink in the cute Swiss-inspired hamlet of Midway. Click here for details.

Bonspiel, Baby!

Unless you follow winter sports avidly, you may never even have heard of curling. This relatively obscure winter sport, first played in Scotland during the 16th century, is surprisingly entertaining. Curling teams consist of four players who take turns sliding 42-pound stones across a sheet of ice to try to score points (a bit like a giant shuffleboard). If you’re keen to learn, check out the latest information from the Park City Curling Club and book yourself a time to throw some rocks at the Park City Ice Arena (600 Gillmor Way). Curling is also available at the Olympic Oval and Ogden Curling Club.

Over the river and through the woods

Live out your own version of jingle bells in a horse-drawn sleigh ride through the wintry wonderland of Park City. You could hardly ask for a more romantic outing or escort to dinner. Whether you’re looking for a one-horse open sleigh or one large enough to accommodate the entire family, local sleighing companies have your back. This is just one of those unique activities you really can’t get back in the city.

Fido-fueled fun

Horses don’t have a monopoly on pulling sleighs; by way of a team of dogs and a musher, aka dogsledding, is another exhilarating way to experience winter. On your trip, you’ll not only be zipping along the snowy trails, you’ll also get to meet the dogs, usually huskies, and learn about the art of dogsledding from the sleigh handler, a.k.a. musher. This is a perfect excursion, especially for families with kids (ages 3+) and we guarantee you’ll leave with a smile on your face.

Giggle and glide

If you lived somewhere cold as a kid, chances are high that you remember sleddingon a local hill. In Park City, you have the chance to relive those childhood days sans the exhausting trudge uphill when you hit up lSoldier Hollow. Both locations offer lower lanes for the younger kiddos and longer runs that are thrilling even for adults.

Start your engines

Shredding powder isn’t exclusively for skiers and snowboarders. For adrenaline-pumping fun without breaking a sweat, hop on a snowmobile and go full throttle. Even if you’ve never been on a snowmobile before, or even considered the possibility, you might just find yourself an enthusiast after one go. Head 45 minutes out of town to Daniels Summit Lodge for a snowmobile retreat, or check out a few of the outfitters in town like Destination Sports and AdventuresRed Pine AdventuresSummit Meadows AdventuresThousand Peaks, and Wasatch Adventure Guides.

Cold weather spin

Park City is well-known for its stellar mountain biking scene, but for winter excursions on two wheels fat tire bikes are the way to go. Some of the best areas to hit up include Round Valley, McLeod and Willow Creek, Glenwild, and the Historic Rail Trail. Just keep in mind, many of Park City’s trails are multi-use so make sure to stay clear of classic skiing tracks and review the trail conditions before heading out. For rentals, check local outfitters All Season Adventures, Storm Cycles, Jans Mountain Outfitters, and White Pine Touring.

Stretch, bend, and om

Have you ever done yoga on a paddle board inside a geothermal crater? Well, now’s your chance yogis because Park City Yoga Adventures offers sessions at the Homestead Crater, a geothermal spring with Caribbean-clear blue water that’s a balmy 95 degrees--go ahead and fall in! You can also pair your yoga session with snowshoeing or sunrise/sunset hikes. We dare you to find a more unique yoga class out there!

In the footsteps of greatness

A trip up to the Utah Olympic Park is worth an entire day for many. They offer a number of winter activities, including rock climbing, zip lining, adventure courses, and the unforgettable bobsled experience where you zoom down the 2002 Olympic sliding track. While you’re there, you can also visit their free museums chronicling the Salt Lake Winter Games and the Alf Engen Ski Museum to learn about the skiing history in the area through interactive displays, games, and a virtual reality ski theater.

Up, up, and away

You can’t beat the spectacular bird’s eye view of the Wasatch mountains from a hot air balloon. Pop a bottle of champagne with your sweetie over a romantic breakfast for two above the world or bring the whole family along for an unforgettable ride. Two companies in town offer balloon rides, Skywalker Ballooning Company and Park City Balloon Adventures.

Horse Play

Traditional horseback riding and sleigh rides are both readily available in the area, but there are far more ways to enjoy horses than just saddling up. Park City Horseoffers a number of unique experiences--from horse meditation circles and reiki to family adventures and corporate team building--that allow you to connect with horses and yourself while exploring self-awareness, intention, and communication. Or, check out Wild Heart Sanctuary where you can practice yoga and experience the healing powers of rescued wild horses.

Arts & Culture

Park City isn’t just an outdoors mecca, this quaint mountain town also embraces arts and culture in a major way, too. For two weeks every January, the film industry pours into Park City for the iconic Sundance Film Festival. But that’s really just the tip of the iceberg, er, mountain.

Stroll and sip

Park City’s historic Main Street has a higher density of art galleries than most places. Walking up and down the street, you can pop into more than a dozen. While you can pop into the galleries any time, we recommend joining in on the Last Friday Gallery Stroll when local gallerists throw open their doors and ply passersby with refreshments from 6 to 9 p.m. on the last Friday of each month.

Indie cinema, anytime

For a dose of independent film, check out the exquisitely curated program from the Park City Film (PCF). Almost every week of the year, PCF screens films ranging from artful child-inspired sagas to thought-provoking documentaries and features. They also have some pretty amazing popcorn toppings (everything from Parmesan cheese to chile sauce).

Live jams

If music is more your thing, you don’t have to look far because even if you don’t ski the après concerts at Park City Mountain and Deer Valley are free and open to everyone. You can also hit up popular live music venues on Main Street, including Park City Live and O.P. Rockwell or see what’s on Park City Institute’s line-up.

Up, up, and away

You can’t beat the spectacular bird’s eye view of the Wasatch mountains from a hot air balloon. Pop a bottle of champagne with your sweetie over a romantic breakfast for two above the world or bring the whole family along for an unforgettable ride. Two companies in town offer balloon rides, Skywalker Ballooning Company and Park City Balloon Adventures.

Horse Play

Traditional horseback riding and sleigh rides are both readily available in the area, but there are far more ways to enjoy horses than just saddling up. Park City Horseoffers a number of unique experiences--from horse meditation circles and reiki to family adventures and corporate team building--that allow you to connect with horses and yourself while exploring self-awareness, intention, and communication. Or, check out Wild Heart Sanctuary where you can practice yoga and experience the healing powers of rescued wild horses.

Stage of many players

While the cultural program at the Eccles Center, the home of the Park City Institute, includes its fair share of concerts, there’s much more available on the line-up. This venerable organization, which celebrated its 20th birthday in 2018, also prides itself on bringing in unique dance groups and a variety of entertainers, authors, and public figures.

Step back in time

Find out the nitty, gritty history of our mountain town by visiting Park City Museum. This isn’t some small, outdated town museum smelling of moth balls and mildew either. Inside you’ll find interactive, attention-grabbing displays that will immerse you in the by-gone days of Park City’s formative silver mining era. The museum even houses its own dungeon, a.k.a. the town’s old jailhouse, which is supposedly haunted.

Homage to King Tut and much more

This historic Egyptian Theatre may have changed names over the years, but its been a constant in Park City’s cultural map since the late 1800s. Today this landmark venue hosts a variety of music performances, theater productions, comedy acts, film, and community events, and more.

Up, up, and away

You can’t beat the spectacular bird’s eye view of the Wasatch mountains from a hot air balloon. Pop a bottle of champagne with your sweetie over a romantic breakfast for two above the world or bring the whole family along for an unforgettable ride. Two companies in town offer balloon rides, Skywalker Ballooning Company and Park City Balloon Adventures.

Horse Play

Traditional horseback riding and sleigh rides are both readily available in the area, but there are far more ways to enjoy horses than just saddling up. Park City Horseoffers a number of unique experiences--from horse meditation circles and reiki to family adventures and corporate team building--that allow you to connect with horses and yourself while exploring self-awareness, intention, and communication. Or, check out Wild Heart Sanctuary where you can practice yoga and experience the healing powers of rescued wild horses.

Food, Drink, & Dining

While Park City’s food scene is certainly inspired by our surroundings, skiing is certainly not a prerequisite for indulging in the dining scene. We couldn’t possibly name all the options out there, but here are a few to get you started.

An aperitif, or two, or three

Despite the significant (and sober) Mormon population, the craft distilling and brewing scene are blossoming in Utah these days, including right here in Park City where High West Distillery reigns supreme. Stop by their saloon for a tour and finish off with a meal and craft cocktails featuring their whiskeys or take the short drive out to Wanship to visit their new distillery on the Blue Sky Ranch. But don’t stop there, you’ll want to hit all the stops on our roadmap to beers, wine, and spiritsin town.

Drink wine and know things

If wine is your thing, then check out one of the many tours and classes offered by the Fox School of Wine. This is “educational happy hour,” meaning in addition to tasting several wines, you’ll also learn about their characteristics and add to your wine vocabulary.

Night time sleigh and dinner

You can make dinner into an event when you book a table at the Snowed Inn. Your evening begins with a horse drawn sleigh ride up to the Snowed Inn (located on the mountain at Park City Resort) followed by a gourmet western dinner, entertainment, and finally a sleigh ride back down the mountain.

Relax

If you came to get away from it all, these ones are for you.

TLC time

There’s nothing quite like a spa day to make your feel like you can take on the world. Pamper yourself with full body treatments, facials, waxing, and, of course, massages of all kinds. You’ll find no lack of options in town with hotels/resorts ready to cater to all your wellness needs, including the Spa Montage, Knead A Message, Remède Spa at the St. Regis Deer Valley, the Spa at Hotel Park City, and more.

Float away all your worries and fears

Channel Eleven from Stranger Things and lose yourself in a sensory deprivation tank at the new Sync Float (1200 W Lori Lane). The tanks are loaded with nine hundred pounds of Epsom salt to you can float effortlessly and forget the world. As the name implies, sensory deprivation removes external inputs like light, sound, and gravity so your body can heal physically and mentally. Just don’t open a door to the upside down!

Get chilly with cryotherapy

Another new therapy trending in Park City is cryotherapy, or exposing your body to sub-zero temps for a fraction of time. The practice is particularly popular with elite athletes and proponents claim it can help with pain relief, inflammation reduction, improved endurance, and better sleep. You can try it for yourself at two locations in Park City: Cryo Lodge (1351 Kearns Blvd) and Stone Cold Cryotherapy (1748 Redstone Center Dr).

Cheers to winter fun everyone!

February events in and around Park City, UT

By ParkCityIs.com
Feb 06, 2019

February Events

2/1 - 2/10: FIS World Championship, Deer Valley Resort, Park City Mountain, and Solitude

2/4: Adam Sandler, Salt Lake City

2/9: It Gets Better Project with San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus, Park City

2/14 - 2/17: Legacy Winter Festival, Midway

2/15 - 2/17: Banff Centre Mountain Film Festival World Tour, Ogden

2/20: Wasatch Speaker Series: Steve Wozniak, Salt Lake City

2/23 - 4/7: Spring Grüv, Park City Mountain

2/28: MUSE Stimulation Theory Tour, Salt Lake City

FIS World Championships-Park City, Utah

By ParkCityIs.com
Feb 06, 2019

https://youtu.be/oRCDS1X-OuY

From February 1st through the 10th, approximately 1,400 athletes from 40 countries will converge on Utah to compete in the 2019 FIS Snowboard, Freestyle and Freeski World Championships, presented by Toyota—the biggest winter sports event to be held in Utah since the 2002 Olympic Winter Games. Contests held as part of this elite event will include snowboardcross and skicross; freeski and snowboard big air, slopestyle and halfpipe; snowboard parallel slalom and parallel giant slalom; and freestyle moguls, dual moguls and aerials.

HOW TO WATCH

There are two ways spectators can get in on the excitement of the 2019 FIS World Championships: watching the events from the comfort of home via the NBC television broadcast or online live stream at nbcsports.com (see complete schedule below) or live, in real time at the venues.

VENUE ACCESS

Solitude kicks off the 2019 FIS World Championships competition schedule with what are likely to be some of the most easily accessible—and perhaps most exciting—events of the entire 10 days: the snowboard and skicross competitions on Feb. 1 to 3. It is highly recommended that spectators take the Utah Transit Authority bus as parking on site at Solitude is limited and will be available to the public at the Moonbeam base area only.

Plan on plenty of time to get to and from the Park City venues—Deer Valley® and Park City Mountain--particularly if you plan to attend the 2019 FIS World Championships opening ceremonies, featuring the freeski big air finals, a free concert with Main Squeeze and fireworks, at Canyons Village on Saturday, Feb. 2, which also happens to be the last night of Park City’s Sundance Film Festival. Deer Valley® Resort’s evening freestyle aerials and moguls events on Feb. 6-9 are also expected to draw high attendance and it is highly recommended that spectators park at Park City High School and take the free bus to Snow Park Lodge.

Get the latest on 2019 FIS World Championships competition, road conditions, weather updates and more by visiting 2019worldchamps

9 Off-Slope Adventures the Whole Family Will Love

By ParkCityIs.com
Feb 06, 2019

What to do with that day off from the ski hill? Look no further than these fun, cross-generational activities.

By Tamerin Smith  12/8/2018 at 12:00pm  Published in the Winter/Spring 2018-19 issue of Park City Magazine

While it’s not easy to beat the gravity-induced fun of a day on the slopes, even the toughest little rippers need an occasional change of scenery. Here’s your guide to the best in off-piste family adventure.

Outdoor Wonders

If your legs are done with the slopes but you’re still craving some downhill speed, Soldier Hollow Nordic Center has 1,200 feet of tubing lanes, all accessible by the magic carpet—it’s all the downhill fun, none of the uphill work. 2002 Soldier Hollow Lane, Midway, 435.654.2002

Discover activities for all ages and curiosities at the 1,200-acre Swaner Preserve and EcoCenter. Kids can test their vertical skills on the indoor climbing wall, track wildlife on a snowshoeing adventure, or color their way through Craft Sunday. 1258 Center Dr, 435.649.1767

The ice-blue wonderland of the Midway Ice Castle is not to be missed. Explore an acre of rooms, tunnels, and slides made entirely of ice and illuminated by a kaleidoscope of LED lights. Dress for the chilly night air and wander through a crystalline fairyland. Located near the Homestead Resort in Midway. Advance tickets only. 866.435.2850

Spin a little mountain-town vacation magic at the Park City Resort Ice Rink. Twinkle lights, hot cocoa, and music set the stage for making memories gliding (or falling) together. Complimentary skate walkers make it easy for the littlest skaters. 1415 Lowell Ave, 435.615.8165

Grow Your Budding Artist

Stoke your artistic flame at Red Flower Studios, where kids from 2 to 99 years old use breath and fire to make hand-blown glass creations. From abstract trinkets to a new favorite smoothie cup, here the transformative power of fire lights imaginations. 1755 Bonanza Dr, Unit C, 435.602.1949

At Paint Fusion, kids of all ages can choose from several hundred ceramic objects and paint them however they like. Decorate animals, fantasy creatures, platters, mugs, or even candy bowls. The work is kiln-fired for a professional finish, so plan on a couple days before picking up your masterwork. You can also up the artistic ante with a custom glass fusion piece. 1635 Redstone Center Dr, #115, 435.575.6463

Think you can’t paint? Think again. At the Paint Mixer, professionals lead you and your crew, step-by-step, in the creation of your own masterpiece. Your house will be the perfect showcase of the talent you didn’t know you had. 738 Main St, 435.604.0820

Keep the Good Times Rolling

Bowling, billiards, and video games at Jupiter Bowl provide hours of family fun. While you’re there, call dinner done by ordering a round of gourmet burgers or a hand-tossed pizza; and grown-ups can top off the high-octane revelry with a cocktail from the bar. 1090 Center Dr, 435.658.2695

Part intimate arcade, part upscale tavern, Daly’s Pub & Rec at the Montage is as much geared toward your inner foodie as it is the kid in you. Play video games or tabletop shuffleboard, and don’t miss the main attraction, the four-lane bowling alley—right next to the gourmet kitchen. Call ahead for availability. 9100 Marsac Ave, 435.604.1532 

Meet the man behind most of the ski maps in America

By ParkCityIs.com
Jan 09, 2019

The ski trail map at your local mountain was probably painted by James Niehues. Now you can see his life's work in one beautiful book.

There’s good chance that any time you slide off the top of a chairlift, you’ll be faced with James Niehues’s work. The 72-year-old Coloradan has hand-painted the maps used by more than 200 ski resorts. But skiing’s most prolific artist says he stumbled into it by luck. In 1987, Niehues had just moved to Denver from Grand Junction, Colorado. He had a couple of kids, and he was looking for work as a graphic designer after his work at an auto-parts manufacturer dried up. He reached out to local artist Bill Brown, who gave him a one-off job working on the trail map for Winter Park’s Mary Jane Mountain. Brown, who was the only resort-map artist at the time, was looking to retire, and he passed the ski-map mantle on to Niehues.

Aside from ideal timing, Niehues says he thinks he has an innate ability to see a whole mountain in one shot. We’d have to agree—his maps are incredibly accurate, down to the parking lots, but with a nostalgic wash of pastel color that’s instantly recognizable.

Thanks to a Kickstarter campaign that runs until January 3 (and has far exceeded its goal), he plans to release a book this summer showcasing three decades’ worth of work. Niehues told us about his book project, the mountains he’s always wanted to draw, why you can’t beat a hand-painted trail map, and how technology has changed his job for the better.

On His Process: “I always fly over the mountain and photograph it. Today I can go in deep on Google, but aerial photography gives me an idea of what it looks like that I can quote from. Then the first step is to go into a small pencil sketch. If it’s a complicated mountain, and I see different ways to illustrate it, I’ll send different thumbnails to clients. Then I’ll go into a comprehensive sketch that will be as big as the map. Once it’s approved, I’ll project the image onto my painting surface, trace every detail, and then airbrush. I start with the sky and work from the top down filling in details.”

On the Details: “It’s a puzzle to put together. I struggled early on getting the back sides of mountains right. I’m constantly trying to get all the flow lines correct and running down the page. Resorts know what they want and need, but sometimes they want to show their mountain bigger than it is. My job is to bring it back to reality. My favorite mountains are the ones where I can paint cliffs or rugged peaks and the mountains beyond. But I really like to do the mountains in New Zealand, because there are no trees there.”

On Skiing: “I learned in ski in Europe when I was in the Army. A couple of us guys took leave and went to down to Switzerland. Mine was the fastest time down, so I thought I was pretty good. When I tried to ski again at Powderhorn, outside Grand Junction, after I came back in 1969, I walked off the mountain because I couldn’t turn. On the job, I became an intermediate skier. It’s important, because I understand what other skiers go through in navigating the mountain.”

On the History of Ski Maps: “There are artists that have drawn a few maps, but there are really only two others who have done what I do. In the 1970s, Hal Shelton pioneered it here in the States. He was the first to paint trail maps, and he did it with an airbrush, because you can create subtle surfaces and lots of backlight. Bill Brown did it in the eighties, and then I took over for him. In the late nineties, everyone was looking at new technology because they thought computers could do a better job of mapping, but a lot of them have come back to my style. Now with the internet, it’s so important to have a good image. You’ve got a mountain that’s beautiful and challenging, and you’ve got to show that, and the computer images just aren’t as beautiful. This is one thing that is better done the way it was done 50 years ago.”

On Anthologizing: “Way back in the mid-nineties I started thinking that maybe I’d have enough illustrations for a book, so I started working book rights into my contract. Didn’t pursue it heavily, but then I started realizing, I’m 72 now, so it’s time to get it going.”

On Retirement: “I’ve tried to retire, but then someone will call me and I’ve always wanted to do their mountain, so I end up jumping back in. I’m doing a sketch of Mount Bachelor right now; they have 180 degrees of skiing, and I’ve always wanted to do that. An artist named Rad Smith, who is in Bozeman, Montana, is working as a protégé. He used to make maps with computers but realized he couldn’t do it as well, so he went back to painting. There don’t seem to be any others who are jumping into it. It’s a small market. It was a small market for me.”

On Art: “I think of the paintings as art instead of trail maps. In the early days, it was really about the map, but the values have shifted. Hal and Bill realized it was important to get the beauty and to give people something they could look at and dream about. I think a computer-generated map is a reflection of the office—it’s rigid. A hand-painted map reflects the outdoors. You ski to get into that environment.”

The Midway Ice Castles are officially open for the season

By ParkCityIs.com
Jan 07, 2019

JAN 3, 2019

Since 2011, Utahns have visited a winter wonderland in Midway. This Saturday, Ice Castles opens for the season. KPCW’s Emily Means has this report.

Icy fortresses, slippery slides and frozen waterfalls decorate an acre of land at Ice Castles at the Homestead Resort in Midway.

Visitors are drawn in by interactive light and music displays. The design of the castles changes year to year, with 20 to 40 ice artisans tasked with creating structures formed from thousands of icicles. Construction on the castles began in November, and Ice Castles typically opens between Christmas and early January, depending on how many warm days there are during the building process.

With six locations—five throughout the U.S. and one in Canada—Ice Castles CEO Ryan Davis explains how the structures, comprised of more than 20 million pounds of ice, come to life each year.

“All of our ingredients come out of a fire hydrant. We make about five to ten thousand icicles in a day," Davis said. "Then we place them, we fuse them to ice and we spray them with water, and when they’re sprayed with water they thicken and they grow in mass. So, it’s basically we just hand place the framework that we freeze the ice on, and everything’s made out of ice.”

After a good snow, snowmen and forts can often be seen decorating front yards in Utah. Ice Castles similarly sprung up from the ground, when Davis says his business partner, Brent Christensen, got creative one cold day in Utah.

“He’d moved from California to Utah, so the cold weather was a novelty for [Christensen]. He just started freezing things in his front yard and figured out that he could use icicles and build—fairly quickly—really tall ice formations," Davis said. "The first place he did it was in 2010 in Zermatt Resort up in Midway at a larger scale, and then I teamed up with him about then, and we just keep growing bigger and bigger.”

If last year’s warm, dry winter is any indication of what to expect in years to come, though, Ice Castles’ cold-reliant operations might require some adjustment. Davis says he’s not sure what has led to the number of warm days, but the more mild weather is something Ice Castles is particularly sensitive to.

“The weather’s always unpredictable, and we noticed that the Midwest seems to be warmer than it has been in the past," Davis said. "You imagine Minneapolis being really cold, and sometimes it is, but a lot of times it’s been pretty warm in the winter there. Every now and then you’ll have a week with three or four days in the 40s, and then the next week it’s five degrees. The average is still pretty cold, but it seems like there’s more warm days than there has been in the past.”

Ice Castles remains open until the weather warms up, usually around late February or early March. Guests are advised to dress appropriately—wear boots to keep your feet dry during the warmer times of day. You can visit icecastles.com for hours of operation and ticketing information.

In the News

There's Only One Park City.

In true Park City fashion, the entire town seemed in attendance at Legacy Lodge for Vail Resort's announcement of One Park City, its new brand and resort launch. After the intro video, Vail's Chief Operating Officer and Chief Marketing Officer spoke about the new brand and Vail's progress-to-date on its $50 Million improvement plan.

Our biggest takeaway: the largest resort in America is now operating right here in Park City. After $50 million in capital improvements, which will be completed in time for opening this winter, mountain visitors will have access to 7,300 acres of ski terrain, 17 peaks, and a resort that extends 6.5 miles in length.

The new Quicksilver gondola is proceeding on schedule and will be operational for the 2015-2016 season. Vail Resorts settled on the name "Quicksilver" because it denotes Park City's mining history and the speed of the 8-person, state-of-the-art conveyance, which transports riders from the base of Silverlode to the Flatiron Lift via Pinecone Ridge in just 8 minutes.

The restaurant formerly known as Snow Hut, has been re-named Miners Camp and will seat 500. Additional improvements and expansions will be made to Red Pine Lodge (capacity will be expanded by 250 seats), Summit House, and Legacy Lodge. Snow making has also been added to Iron Mountain and near the gondola.

The new consolidated resort will operate under the name, Park City. The logo was re-purposed from Canyons Resort and has the tagline, "There is only one. Park City."

 

In the News

 

Vail Releases Details of Improvement Plan

Today, Vail Resorts shared their action and improvement plan with regards to Park City Mountain Resort and Canyons Resort. The plan includes more than $50 million in improvements that will take place in just one season, making it the most ambitious ski resort improvement strategy to date. The changes will create the largest ski resort in America by combining Park City Mountain Resort and Canyons Resort. Here are some specific improvements listed in Vail's comprehensive press release:

The Interconnect Gondola. An eight-passenger, high-speed two-way gondola from the base of the existing Silverlode Lift at Park City to the Flatiron Lift at Canyons. The gondola will also have an unload at the top of Pine Cone Ridge to allow skiers and riders the opportunity to ski into Thaynes Canyons at Park City via gated ski access or to the Iron Mountain area at Canyons through new trails that will be created from Pine Cone Ridge. 

Upgrade of King Con and Motherlode Lifts at Park City. The King Con  Lift will be upgraded from a four-person to a six-person, high-speed detachable chairlift. The Motherlode Lift will be upgraded from a fixed-grip triple to a four-person, high-speed detachable chairlift. 

New Snow Hut Restaurant, Upgrades to Summit House Restaurant at Park City and Expansion of Red Pine Lodge Restaurant at Canyons. The plan calls for building a completely new Snow Hut restaurant at the base of the Silverlode Lift and next to the Park City terminal for the Interconnect Gondola, with 500 indoor seats and a top-of-the-line kitchen and culinary experience. The plan also includes an upgrade to the "scramble" area inside the Summit House restaurant to improve the flow of diners and increase seats. At Canyons, the Red Pine Restaurant will be renovated to accommodate an additional 250 indoor seats. 

Snowmaking and Other Improvements. The plan features additional snowmaking on two trails in the Iron Mountain area of Canyons which will become increasingly central ski terrain given its proximity to the Interconnect Gondola. The plan also includes almost $5 million of "catch up" maintenance and upgrades at Park City, given the lack of spending at the resort over the past few years. 

"This comprehensive capital plan for Park City and Canyons is one of the most ambitious and impactful plans undertaken at any resort in industry history, transforming the experience at both resorts and creating the largest single ski resort in the U.S. with more than 7,300 acres of skiable terrain," said Blaise Carrig, president of the mountain division for Vail Resorts. He added, "The improvements offer skiers and riders more terrain and upgraded lifts to enhance the guest experience and reduce crowding and lift lines, new and upgraded restaurants, more snowmaking and an overall ‘touching up’ of all aspects of the resorts. The plan was based on feedback from guests and the local community as well as discussions with the senior operating teams at the two resorts. We look forward to continuing to work with the county and the city and are hopeful we can bring this plan to life for the 2015-2016 ski season."

 

In the News

In the News

Deer Valley Purchases Solitude

DEER VALLEY RESORT, PARK CITY, UTAH (October 3, 2014) – Deer Valley Resort has entered into an agreement to purchase Solitude Mountain Resort and will begin operating the resort on May 1, 2015.

“Solitude is an incredible resort and provided a huge opportunity for us to expand our offerings right here in Utah,” said Bob Wheaton, president and general manager of Deer Valley Resort. “Solitude is in unique position with their widely varied terrain that attracts both local and destination skiers. We are ecstatic to be able to add the resort to the Deer Valley® family.”

“The DeSeelhorst family has enjoyed being a part of Solitude’s history for almost 40 years. We are proud of what we have been able to accomplish at the resort and in our mountain community,” said Dave DeSeelhorst, owner and general manager of Solitude Mountain Resort. “We feel very fortunate for the opportunity to have worked with so many amazing people in our industry and most importantly being able to work with our incredible staff at Solitude over the years. It is exciting to pass on this unique and beautiful resort to one of the best resort operators in the country, Deer Valley.”

For the upcoming 2014-15 ski season, Solitude will operate as usual under the leadership of the DeSeelhorst family. To foster the most effective and strategic change over, select Deer Valley staff will work alongside Solitude staff during the next six months to evaluate resort operations and gain knowledge about the Solitude brand and culture. Deer Valley will then take full ownership of Solitude Mountain Resort on May 1, 2015.

 

In the News

 

Park City Mountain Resort Sells to Vail for $180. Million

September/ 2014

Powdr Corp. has sold its Park City Mountain Reosrt to Vail Reosrts, ending a tumultuous year for Utah’s most popular ski destination.

"Selling was the last thing we wanted to do, and while we believe the law around this issue should be changed, a protracted legal battle is not in line with our core value to be good stewards of the resort communities in which we operate," Powdr CEO John Cumming said in a statement. "A sale was the only way to provide long-term certainty for PCMR employees and the Park City community. My family and I are extremely grateful to have had the opportunity to play a role in making PCMR what it is today, and we deeply appreciate the dedicated employees and all of the people who have supported us over the years."

The deal requires Vail Resorts to retain Park City Mountain Resort employees.

Powdr owned the Utah resort for more than 20 years, growing it into one of the most popular ski areas in North America.

According to Vail's Press Releases, with the acquisition, all aspects of the previously disclosed litigation with respect to PCMR have been settled and this dispute will no longer pose any future threat to disrupt the operation of the resort.

"First and foremost, we are very pleased to bring a permanent end to this dispute and provide assurance to the guests and employees of PCMR, and to everyone in the Park City community, that they no longer have to worry about any disruption to the operation of the Resort. This has been a difficult period for everyone involved and I commend John Cumming and Powdr Corp. for helping to find a solution to this situation," said Rob Katz, chairman and chief executive officer of Vail Resorts.

"Park City Mountain Resort is one of the most spectacular mountain resorts and iconic brands in the ski industry and I am proud to have the resort become a part of Vail Resorts. The acquisition will allow us to immediately bring Park City Mountain Resort onto the Epic Pass, which will now offer skiers from across the country and around the world access to 22 resorts. We look forward to working collaboratively with the entire Park City community, as well as city and county officials, as we chart the future for the resort, including how we can best bring the Canyons and Park City ski experiences together to create the largest mountain resort in the United States," he added.  

Mountain operations of PCMR and Canyons will remain separate for the 2014-2015 ski season. However, the Epic Pass and Epic Local Pass will be valid at PCMR. All PCMR passes for the 2014-2015 ski season will continue to be honored and can be exchanged or upgraded for a season pass that will also be valid at Canyons. The majority of all lift tickets sold at either resort will be valid at both PCMR and Canyons.

 

Canyons in the News

Patrick Meek:
Ultimate Weekender, 
HHonors Team Member and Sponsored U.S. Olympic Athlete

Speed skater Patrick Meek, is not only an U.S. Olympic hopeful but a team member at the Waldorf Astoria Park City. He hasn't taken much time off the ice recently in his preparations for the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games and the Waldorf Astoria Park City has worked around Patrick's speed skating schedule to help make his Olympic dreams come true.

 

Canyons Golf Course making headway

 Completion expected by September 2014
 Aaron Osowski, The Park Record

  

 

 

 

It has been a much-delayed project through a development process that occurred over a decade ago, but at long last completion of the Canyons Resort Golf Course is expected in less than a year's time.

The 6,256-yard, par-70 course designed by Gene Bates and the Bates Golf Design Group will feature over 1,000 feet of elevation change. According to Guicho Pons, Officer with TCFC Finance Co., the course is expected to be completed by Sept. 30, 2014.

"[The course] was part of the original SPA (Specially Planned Area) agreement in 1999 and for whatever reason it was never done," Pons said. "We started construction in June and made really good progress over the last five months."

MVC Construction and Landscapes Unlimited have been contracted in the construction of the course and Pons said that "substantial progress" has been made on 14 holes with rough grading complete on the remaining four holes. Several holes are "virtually completed," he added, except for tees and greens, as the window for seeding closed.

TCFC Finance Spokesperson Todd Burnette said that, since they had to work with predetermined terrain in designing the course, there were challenges involved in construction.

"The challenges in building the course will end up being interesting features for players," Burnette said. "Elevation changes and elevated tees will provide incredible views from the Uinta Mountains to Old Town and all three ski areas."

Pons said they are almost finished with the irrigation systems on 14 holes. There are no irrigation systems on the rough graded holes and the course will utilize what they call a "fertigation" system which allows fertilizer to be applied directly through the irrigation system.

The irrigation system will also feature a computer system that can accommodate different "micro-climates" for the various holes. Pons said that, for instance, the holes on Willow Drop have a different micro-climate than holes near State Road 224.

Burnette calls the course "very unique" and said it has the ability to be a strong driver of out-of-state tourism during the summer, especially for corporate groups.

"There really hasn't been a golf course set up [in the area] to take advantage of large corporate groups," Burnette said.

Dave Dubois, a resident of Sun Peak and president of the Sun Peak Homeowners Association, said he and other residents near Canyons Resort are excited about the completion of the course's construction.

"We're all looking forward to having it completed. The holes look great and the paths seem first-rate," Dubois said.

Dubois did note that those residents near some of the construction have complained of dust being blown by their houses on windy days, so the establishment of green grass will be welcomed by many.

Pons said the course, which has an expected total cost of $25 million, has not received many complaints. The only notable complaints have been related to the rock cuts that have taken place on the hill near the Miners Club and Fairway Springs.

"We tried to minimize the environmental impact of the course. People complain about the rock cuts but don't realize that all of that material that came out was used in the golf course," Pons said.

Crews also employed a rock crushing machine that crushed material to be used as topsoil for holes farther down the hill, Pons said, which minimized the hauling of enormous amounts of material up and down the hill.

"The main thing to note is that we've listened to all of the residents' concerns and addressed [them]," Burnette said. "The vast majority of property owners are looking at this as a very positive thing."

For photos and information about the Canyons Golf Course, visit canyonsresortgolfcourse.com.