In The News

Boost Your Value of Your Home

By ParkCityIs.com
Oct 16, 2018

FIVE WAYS HOMEOWNERS CAN BOOST THE VALUE OF THEIR HOME

When contemplating home upgrades or preparing your home for sale, it helps to identify the renovation projects that not only look good but will boost the value of your home at the same time. Overall, potential buyers are drawn to newer, cleaner, refreshed properties. Here are the five tried and true ways homeowners can boost the value of their home.

Freshen Up the Paint This may seem like a no-brainer, but a fresh coat of paint will always make a home feel updated and renewed. Modern, current paint colors can have a vast effect on a home’s appeal. Whites, greys, light blues, and sage-greens are in-style for 2018 and can give your home an updated feel. Contemporary, neutral paint can also give potential buyers the ability to see themselves living in the home.

Update the Windows Natural light enhances ambiance and updating windows can boost a home’s value. Homes that feature 70’s style round, half-moon, or hexagon shaped windows may cause buyers to contemplate pricey renovations or will turn them off from the home completely. Additionally, if your windows are old, drafty, or fog up due to failing seals, fixing these problems will increase the value. Updating window coverings from heavy drapery to hidden or electronic shades can go a long way in adding value and a contemporary feel to the home. Lastly, adding windows to increase natural light can improve a home’s value.

Renew Kitchens and Bathrooms  When it comes to home renovation and updates the two most important spaces in a home are the kitchen and the master bedroom/bathroom. In the master bedroom, focus on brightening the room and creating a fresh, inviting feel. Clean, modern paint colors and neutral fresh carpet or renewed hardwood floors can make a huge difference. In the master bathroom, potential buyers are trending toward light and bright features such as subway tile, marble, and clean lines over dark woods and granites. In the kitchen, making minor changes such as painting the cabinets in a modern color, updating the tile, or replacing old-fashioned, brass light fixtures and hardware with more current styles and contemporary pieces can increase the value of a home.

Add Smart Technology Features As we move farther into the age of technology, home trends are following suit. Many potential buyers see a lot of value in smart technology features such as electronic window shades, smart thermostats, slim TVs, and more. That being said, one electronic feature that used be popular but has been falling out of trend is pre-wired sound systems. With wireless speaker systems on the rise, buyers are bringing their systems into their new homes or upgrading as needed.

Revive Curb Appeal First impressions can make a big impression. Enhance landscaping, clean up the walkway to the front door, and repair or seal driveway cracks. A fresh coat of paint including window frames and the front door can make an older home feel new again. If paint is not in the budget, power washing the outside of the house, so long as it doesn’t strip the paint, and the front walkway or driveway can also refresh the appearance. Lastly, updating the porch sconces and lighting can make a home look more current and inviting.

Whether you are looking to spend a little or a lot, there are many ways to add value to your home. However, for any major physical changes to the home, its best to hire a designer to help make sure the improvements are truly up-to-date and generic enough to appeal to a wide audience. For recommendations on designers or for more advice on ways to boost the value of your home, reach out to your Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties agent as they truly are the experts on homes in our community.

Published in Park City Home Magazine 3/5/18

Own Your Own Wintertime Fun!

By ParkCityIs.com
Oct 11, 2018

US News Ranks Utah the 3rd Best State for Education!

By ParkCityIs.com
Oct 11, 2018

Utah ranked #3

The quality of a community’s schools is central to any family’s aspirations. Public education has largely been a local matter for school boards and states that allocate most of their funding. Yet for the past several decades, the federal government has entered the field in important and often disputed ways. With the No Child Left Behind Act, President George W. Bush put in place requirements that schools demonstrate “adequate yearly progress” based on standardized student testing. The law was replaced during the Obama administration with the Every Student Succeeds Act. Many states also coordinated with the federal government in Common Core standards for basic curriculum. Now Republicans are promoting another direction based on charter schools, privately run schools operated with public oversight and funding, and school choice, enabling parents to decide which public or private schools their children attend with public funding.

Massachusetts ranks as the No. 1 state in education, by all these measures; New Jersey is No. 2. Several other Eastern Seaboard states stand out: New Hampshire, Vermont, Maryland and Virginia. And some Midwestern and Western states also rank in the top 10 in education: Nebraska, Iowa, Utah and Washington. Eight of the states that rank in the top 10 in education also rank in the top 10 overall in the Best States rankings.

Article:

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/rankings/education

Utah October Events

By ParkCityIs.com
Oct 08, 2018

 

3/3 - 10/21: Real Salt Lake, Sandy

Sundays, 6/3 - 10/28: 9th West Farmer's Market, Salt Lake City

Sundays, 6/3 - 10/28: Wheeler Farm Sunday Market, Salt Lake City

Wednesdays, 6/6 - 10/10: Park City Farmers Market, Park City

Fridays and Saturdays, 7/27 - 10/27: Murray Park Farmers Market, Murray

Saturdays, 5/12 - 10/20 - Cache Valley Gardeners Market, Logan

Saturdays, 6/2 - 10/27: Provo Farmers Market, Provo

Saturdays, 6/6 - 10/20: Downtown Farmers Market at Pioneer Park, Salt Lake City

Saturday and Sunday, 8/18 - 10/21: Oktoberfest, Snowbird

8/30 - 11/24: Utah Utes Football, Salt Lake City

9/1 - 11/24: BYU Cougar Football, Provo

9/14 - 10/30: Lagoon's Frightmares, Farmington

10/5 - 10/30: Thriller - Odyssey Dance Theatre, Traveling throughout Utah

9/28 - 10/14: 2018 Downtown Dine O'Round, Salt Lake City

10/1 - 10/14: Park City Dine About 2018, Park City

10/4 - 10/29: The Pumpkin Train, Heber City

10/6 - 11/3: Halloween Activities, Thanksgiving Point

10/16: Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Salt Lake City

10/17: Jimmy Buffett: Son of a Son of a Sailor Tour, Salt Lake City

10/19 - 4/29: Utah Jazz, Salt Lake City

10/21 - 4/7: Utah Grizzlies, West Valley City

10/20: Thomas Rhett Life Changes Tour 2018, Salt Lake City

10/29: Josh Groban with Idina Menzel, Salt Lake City

10/31: 2018 Halloween and Dog Parade, Park City

Park City, Utah #5- not to late to hit the trails

By ParkCityIs.com
Oct 08, 2018

These are the 10 Best Mountain Biking Trails in North America! Spoiler: Park City came in at #5

5. Flying Dog

Park City, Utah

Flying Dog is a scenic, fairly non-technical IMBA-designated Epic Ride. It’s perfect for groups with intermediate mountain bikers, as well as experts, who can enjoy cruising down the fast, buffed out dirt and over bridges that cross ponds and streams. The shortest route is a 10-mile ride with a 1,500 vertical feet elevation change, so be prepared. Options include a 10-mile easier ride, a 16-mile moderate ride and a 23-mile ride with 3,000 feet of climbing.

Article: https://www.onthesnow.com/news/a/106787/top-10-mountain-biking-trails-in-north-america

Trail Safety 101: What to do when you meet a moose!

By ParkCityIs.com
Sep 30, 2018

Trail Safety 101: When You Meet a Moose

How to avoid angering one of Park City’s most frequently seen wild animals.

By Michaela Wagner 9/19/2017 at 11:53am

If you’ve spent any time of Park City’s trails, you’ve probably spotted a moose or two. Around these parts, moose are even known to wander into town to take a stroll down Main Street (much to the delight of out-of-town visitors) or attack local gardens. Presumably, most people who live here know how to handle themselves around these notoriously irritable animals, but it’s always worth mentioning again for those of us who just can’t seem to help wanting to get closer.

If You Meet a Moose

  • Give the moose plenty of space and DO NOT approach it. Keep at least 50 feet between yourself and the moose while you walk past slowly. From a distance, a moose may simply be content to watch you warily or move away, but if you get closer, your presence might agitate it.
  • Make sure your dog is leashed and under control. The moose will likely decide you and/or your dog is a threat if your pup is running around and barking. Moose will not hesitate to kick a dog, which can be lethal.
  • Don’t get between a mama moose and her calves. If you happen upon a female, be extra careful to assess the scene in case she has little ones nearby. Baby moose are vulnerable to a number of predators, including cougars and bears, so mothers won’t hesitate to aggressively defend their young.

Reasons a Moose Might Charge & Signs of Aggression

Just like other animals, moose have their way of telling you they’re feeling threatened. An angry moose will likely pin its ears back, lower its head, or raise the hackles along its shoulders. If the moose starts moving towards you, it’s a crystal clear message for you to run and get under cover if possible. Usually, if you stay well away from them, moose will simply run away or eye you suspiciously as you pass. A stressed, cornered, or harassed moose, however, might decide to charge. Bull moose are more aggressive and particularly dangerous in September and October during the mating season while cows get prickly during the late spring during calving season.

If A Moose Charges

Should a moose decide to charge you, your only option is to run and take cover. Moose can reach speeds of 30+ m.p.h. so you probably won’t outrun it for long, but at least you’re not going to trigger a predatory response. Your best bet is to try find some kind of cover or climb up a tree if you have time. If the moose catches up and knocks you down, curl into a ball, cover your head as much as you can, and don’t move until the moose leaves. Getting up might make the moose think you’re a renewed threat.

Remember, if you provoke a moose, you’re setting yourself up for a loss since they’re much bigger and more dangerous than you. Best to make some noise, stay away, and let it go about its day.

Eat and drink your way through the fall in Park City and the surrounding areas

By ParkCityIs.com
Sep 17, 2018

Brunch, feast, and shot-ski through the shoulder season.

By Michaela Wagner 8/24/2018 at 10:22am

Ah. Autumn. Park City’s  sleepy season is sneakily brimming with scrumptious events. We’re talking everything from high altitude brunch and farm-to-table eats to shot-skis and full-blown festivals. Save the date for these sparkling events and get ready to eat and drink your way into winter.

Salt Lake City Food & Wine Festival

September 11 -16, various times & events

Take a trip down the canyon for six full days of foodie events at the Salt Lake City Food & Wine Festival. Sip Japanese whiskeys (Sept. 12), dig into brunch and a cooking class at the Park City Culinary Institute (Sept. 15), or pair your beer with fresh seafood as the Bucket O’ Crawfish takes over Shades of Pale Brewery (Sept. 16). If you love food and drinks, there’s no way better to spend your week. Peruse the full schedule of events here.

Harvest Dinner

Saturday, September 15 @ 6 - 10 p.m.

Join the family-owned and operated Mountain Song Farms for a special evening celebrating the season with a rustic meal paired with music and gorgeous scenery. Featuring ingredients sourced from the farm and other local food purveyors, the meal will be created by Park City restaurant Tupelo. In addition to dinner, tickets to the event also include locally sourced wine, beer, and craft cocktails provided by Top Shelf, Alpine Distilling, Old Town Cellars, and Park City Brewery. Check out the Mountain Song Farms website for tickets and details.

Brunch at Altitude

Saturday, September 22 @ 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Hosted by yours truly, the inaugural Brunch at Altitude at Summit Watch Plaza is a celebration of the season and our favorite meal: brunch! Come savor delectable bites, grab a drink and cheer on local mixologists as they go head-to-head in the Bloody Mary Smackdown. The entire clan can partake in family-friendly activities, yard games (corn hole, anyone?), music, and more! Don’t forget to bid on an item during the silent auction to support the Peace House, a local non-profit dedicated to fighting domestic violence. Grab VIP tickets for extra special gifts, swag, and promotions. More details and tickets here.

Hoppy Hour

Saturday, September 29 @ 6 - 10 p.m. Did you know one of the key ingredients in beer grows wild all around Park City? Throughout the summer, the Summit Land Conservancy leads guided hikes in Park City’s preserved open spaces to collect the hops. Even if you didn’t tag along for hops hunting, you can still reap the benefits at the annual Hoppy Hour party at Wasatch Brew Pub as they release the “Clothing Hoptional” brew made from the harvest. The $20 entry fee gets you appetizers, two drinks, and entry into an opportunity drawing. Get your tickets here.

3rd Annual World’s Longest Shot Ski

Saturday, October 13 @ 2 p.m.

Park City’s rivalry with Breckenridge, CO continues as the competition heats up, yet again, for the glory of holding the world’s longest shot ski record. This year, Sunrise Rotary has teamed up with Park City’s iconic High West Distillery to offer all participants a shot of Rendezvous Rye whiskey (in lieu of the traditional Wasatch beer-filled nip). For $25 you get a spot on the shot ski, a souvenir glass, and a token for a High West specialty drink at one of the after-party locations. Grab your friends and join in on the party while working (okay, reveling) for a good cause; all proceeds go to Sunrise Rotary Club’s Grant Program benefitting 20 community organizations. The shot ski tends to sell out, so get your tickets early and be a part of history.

Looks like it’s shaping up to be a pretty delicious autumn season!

Here are 5 dog friendly patios around Park City

By ParkCityIs.com
Sep 10, 2018

Bring your doggy to dinner at these Park City eateries where canine companions—and not just service animals—are allowed.

By Melissa Fields 6/18/2018 at 10:00am Published in the June 2018 issue of Park City Magazine

Collie’s Sports Bar & Grill

738 Main St, 435.649.0888, colliesbarandgrill.com

A casual hangout serving great burgers, icy-cold beers, and the best-ever pulled pork nachos.

Deer Valley Grocery Café

1375 Deer Valley Dr S, 435.615.2300, deervalley.com

Affordable, fantastic fare served on a sunny deck overlooking the Deer Valley SUP ponds.

Lespri Prime Steak Sushi Bar

1765 Sidewinder Dr, 435.649.5900, lespriprime.com

Indulge in fabulous steak and sushi on this tucked-away patio with flowers, fire pits, and live music.

Silver Star Café

1825 Three Kings Dr, 435.655.3456, thesilverstarcafe.com

This award-winning eatery is located at the Silver Star trailhead with views of both mountains and the golf course. 

Twisted Fern

1300 Snow Creek Dr, 435.731.8238, twistedfern.com

Super-fresh, creative fare is the rule at this charming, locally beloved bistro.

Celebrate summer’s last hurrah with a jam-packed 48 hours in Park City

By ParkCityIs.com
Sep 05, 2018

This itinerary will make you wonder why fall in the mountains was ever referred to as the off season.

Edited by Melissa Fields 8/23/2018 at 3:21pm

Though this glorious Park City summer is coming to a close and the area’s main claim to fame—snow—is still on its brief hiatus, calling fall the “off-season” is simply a misnomer. You could spend a week up here in September and October and still not make a dent in all the things to do, eat, and see. But since weeklong vacations are a rarity for most of us, following is an itinerary for an idyllic 48 hours in Utah’s most famous mountain town; one that, while nowhere near comprehensive, hits many of the highlights, both well-known and more obscure.

Friday

5 p.m. - Check in to the Washington School House Hotel

The Washington School House Hotel

Built in 1889 as a working school to service families flocking to Park City during the 19th century’s silver mining boom, this historic building has been meticulously restored and luxuriously appointed in a way that’s anything but old fashioned. (Rates start at $480 per night in the summer.) The hotel’s elegant main dining/gathering space—replete with original art, antiques, and a signature white-lacquered antler chandelier—host’s daily afternoon snack time (running from 5 to about 6:30 p.m.), which always includes something savory and sweet, such as ample charcuterie boards and chocolate Rice Crispie treats.

7 p.m. - Take in a live show Mosey down to Main Street for a cocktail and soak up some wicked riffs and vocals at The Spur Bar & Grill (live music nightly). Big name acts also make their way to these here hills. So, if that autumn sojourn happens to align perfectly with, for example, Jason Mraz’s September 3 show at Deer Valley’s Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater, pack a picnic and hop a free city bus to the gorgeous on-slope setting. The George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Center for the Performing Arts and The Mary G. Steiner Egyptian Theatre also host shows of note this fall: the Egyptian’s classic Charles Dickens tale Oliver!, September 7–16; and The New Chinese Acrobats’ circus spectacular on October 26 (The Eccles Center).

Shabu’s Poke Salad

9 p.m. - Late supper at Shabu More than 200 eateries dot the Park City landscape but few offer the attention to detail, knowledgeable staff, consistently fantastic fare, and funky vibe found at the Asian-fusion Shabu, owned and operated by brothers and long-time locals Bob and Kevin Valaika. Menu standouts include the blistered green beans, the poke salad, the samurai scallops, the ramen soup, and anything off the sushi menu. Shabu’s wine and saketini list reflects and enhances the creative menu.

11 p.m. - Sip a nightcap at Butcher’s Chop House & Bar

If the night is brisk (as they often deliciously are in the mountains), sip a craft cocktail or glass of red wine inside Butcher’s cozy and very adult lounge. And if the weather’s balmy, relax under the sta rs outside on the back patio before heading back to the Washington School House Hotel to slip between the Pratesi linens and drift off to sleep.

Saturday

8 a.m. - Break your fast in-house

Breakfast is served at the Washington School House Hotel

A fresh, full, made-to-order breakfast is included with every stay at the Washington School House Hotel. Choose from house-made granola, omelettes, eggs any style, fresh juices and fruit, and French press coffee.

9 a.m. - Hit the trail

In case you’ve been living under a rock, Park City, riddled with more than 400 miles of trails, has emerged as a nationally recognized mountain biking mecca. For an epic, 26-mile singletrack tour through Deer Valley and the sprawling Park City Mountain, start pedaling north on the Mid Mountain Trail at Deer Valley’s Silver Lake Village. Ride the mostly rolling miles to your final descent along the Holly’s or Ambush trails into Canyons Village. Here for the leaves, check out all the best places to leaf peep this fall.

Mountain biking at Deer Valley

1 p.m. - Refuel at the Red Tail Grill

The Red Tail Grill offers more simply satisfying pub-style fare. Take a seat on the wide patio and order an overflowing platter of calamari rings or the smoked Utah trout flatbread with a frosty locally brewed beer—you’ve earned it.

3 p.m. - Poolside chill time

Head back to the Washington School House Hotel, slip on your swim suit and retire to the upper-level pool and hot tub where the friendly and attentive staff will deliver wine, cocktails, and beer at your request.

5:30 p.m. - Cocktails and dinner at The Nelson Cottage

The lovingly restored N elson Cottage by High West Distillery offers a prix-fixe dinner with a menu of the chef’s choosing in a communal dining setting on Saturday evening.

An optional whiskey pairing (which is a MUST do) is offered to complement each course. (An ever-changing list of wines available by the bottle or glass or a small selection of international beers is also available.)

Sunday

9 a.m. - Play nine holes at Park City’s newest course, Canyons Golf

Canyons Golf, an 18-hole course at Park City Mountain’s Canyons Village

Though most of the holes here are par 3s, don’t underestimate the lack of yardage for less-than-challenging play. Winding fairways and angled greens provide plenty of difficulty on Park City’s newest track. And don’t worry about being too tired after your ride to walk this mountainous course—carts are required with all rounds of play.

Noon - Brunch at Tupelo Park City

Tupelo’s ethereal chicken and biscuits

IMAGE: TUPELO

For a twist on the traditional Sunday mainstay, make reservations for brunch at one of Park City’s newest--and best--restaurants, Tupelo. The Sunday daytime menu here spans familiar favorites like Eggs Benedict and omelettes but all are presented with Chef Matt Harris’ signature southern flair. For our money, the best dish on the menu is chicken and biscuits: a perfectly crispy fried chicken breast served on the best biscuit we’ve ever had the pleasure of chewing, a sunnyside egg, and velvety gravy.

2 p.m. - Gallery hop on Historic Main Street

A stroll through Park City’s historic Main Street is just what the doctor ordered after an action packed fall weekend in the mountains. More than 200 shops, galleries, and restaurants pack this quaint and appealing thoroughfare. Just try to resist taking a little piece of Park City home with you. Maybe a ski jacket? Appropriate when you visit Park City again in a couple of months after the snow flies.

Not bad for a weekend getaway, right? Stay tuned with all the latest events this fall and winter via our events calendar.

10 reasons to live (the dream) in Park City

By ParkCityIs.com
Aug 31, 2018

TravelI cover luxury travel, adventure sports and various ways to drive fast

"Quality of life."

That's the short answer to why we moved from Los Angeles to Park City, Utah, in 2016.

The long answer is that I wanted my kids to grow up in a small community, ideally a ski town. I also wanted them to go to quality public schools, to have a range of winter sports available to them and to experience all four seasons. Selfishly, I wanted to ski up to 100 days per year and live within a sprawling network of mountain biking trails. Bottom line, though, I wanted to reduce my living costs and have a house big enough to host a large family and store all my toys.

In other words: quality of life.

Why would someone want to move to Park City, Utah? The answer to this should be self evident. But since you asked, here are 10 good reasons:

1. Some of the Best Ski Resorts in the World: At 7,000 feet above sea level, Park City has a year-round population of about 25,000 and is home to two ski resorts: Deer Valley Resort and Park City Mountain Resort. The former was voted the #1 ski resort in North America by SKI Magazine (2018) and is exclusive to skiers. The latter has the most skiable terrain (7,300 acres) in the United States and is open to snowboarders.

2. More Amazing Ski Resorts: There are many more world-class ski resorts within an hour's drive: Alta, Snowbird, Brighton, Solitude, Snowbasin, and Powder Mountain to name a few. Not to mention Powderbird Helicopter Skiing, which picks up in town.

Just your local Olympic training centerPARK CITY CHAMBER/BUREAU

3. Education: The public school system is the best in the state, and Park City High School ranks in the top 2% nationally. Park City public schools let out at 12:30pm on Fridays so students can go skiing or participate in other sports. There is also Winter Sports School, a charter high school that operates on a reverse schedule to accommodate winter competition and travel. If private school is preferred, Park City Day School goes from kindergarten to eighth grade and has been under the leadership of Ian Crossland for the past year.

A 45-minute drive from Salt Lake but a world awayPARK CITY CHAMBER/BUREAU

4. Convenience: Salt Lake City International Airport is a 30- to 45-minute drive from town (no traffic), from where a flight to LA or San Francisco is about 1.5 hours. To accommodate growth, the Utah Department of Transportation has been widening highways, resurfacing roads and expanding traffic circles on a huge scale this year, all of which is well ahead of any congestion issues.

Putting the slopes in Silicon SlopesPARK CITY CHAMBER/BUREAU

5. Business Opportunities: The Beehive state is booming. The Salt Lake/Provo/Park City triangle, dubbed Silicon Slopes, is an emerging tech powerhouse. This is supported by two universities (the University of Utah and BYU) as well as big tech companies (Adobe, Microsoft) and several startup unicorns (Banjo, Domo, Qualtrics).

We've got your water sportsPARK CITY CHAMBER/BUREAU

6. All Four Seasons: Summers are actually better than winters. High temperatures average about 80 degrees F with low humidity. In early June, the aspen trees and wild flowers explode into bloom. Soon the mountainous landscape becomes a tapestry of rich greens that seem to glow as the sun sets after 9:00 pm on the summer solstice. Just 25 minutes away is the Jordanelle Reservoir, which supports boating, paddleboarding, wake surfing, fishing or just relaxing on a pontoon boat for the day. Lest I forget, Park City is home to seven golf courses.

A mountain biking playgroundPARK CITY CHAMBER/BUREAU

7. Mountain Biking: Park City holds the distinction of being the very first Gold Level Ride Center, deemed as such by the International Mountain Bike Association (IMBA). "It all stems from a commitment to master planning," says IMBA's VP of Programs, James Clark. "The sheer miles of trails are fantastic, but what’s important is that they function as a cohesive network, with signage and trail connections that create a model riding area." That network includes nearly 500 miles of singletrack trails that appeal to all ability levels. Plus, Deer Valley runs the lifts for mountain biking and is continually building trails to expand its world-class bike park.

Park City Municipal Golf CoursePARK CITY CHAMBER/BUREAU

8. Cost of Living: Moving from high-tax states like New York and California can reduce living costs substantially, especially given new tax laws. According to TaxFoundation.org, Utah ranks middle of the pack nationally (25th) for state income taxes with a maximum rate of 5%. For combined sales tax, Utah is 29th at 6.77%. As for property taxes, the Beehive State is 40th at an average of 0.65%. However, the property tax rate in Summit County (Park City) is only 0.463%. According to some back-of-the-napkin math, you'll get three- to four-times as much house for the money compared to LA's West Side. And property values appreciated 9.9% annually as of Q1, which ranks fifth in the country according to the FHFA.

Ski right into downtown and then go back up on the Town LiftPARK CITY CHAMBER/BUREAU

9. The State of Utah: Park City is one of many gems in a state full of natural riches. Utah is home to five of the premier National Parks: Zion, Bryce Canyon, Arches, Canyonlands, and Capital Reef — all within a few hours drive time. Renowned mountain biking and off-roading destination, Moab, Utah, is a five-hour drive and also offers access to rafting on the Colorado River. A little further and you can be in The Grand Canyon, Grand Teton, and Yellowstone National Parks.

Live music in the summer is available pretty much every nightPARK CITY CHAMBER/BUREAU

10. All About the Community: When you move to Park City and meet someone who lives in Park City, it's something very powerful you have in common. More than likely you're both here for these 10 reasons and many others. There's an immediate bond. Our next-door neighbors hosted a welcome-to-Park-City party three days after we arrived and invited the surrounding neighbors. I can send a group text to locate my kids in the neighborhood and have them sent home. My wife has made lifelong friends at Park City's premier workout studio/social club, Beau Collective, through a shared passion for fitness. This is partly because the majority of Park City residents are transplants from California, Ohio, Michigan, Texas, Washington and all parts Back East. And since we all moved here for about the same reasons, it creates a community fabric that is woven together with a combination of Lycra, Gore-Tex, carbon fiber and a profound sense of joy and gratitude.

In the News

There's Only One Park City.

In true Park City fashion, the entire town seemed in attendance at Legacy Lodge for Vail Resort's announcement of One Park City, its new brand and resort launch. After the intro video, Vail's Chief Operating Officer and Chief Marketing Officer spoke about the new brand and Vail's progress-to-date on its $50 Million improvement plan.

Our biggest takeaway: the largest resort in America is now operating right here in Park City. After $50 million in capital improvements, which will be completed in time for opening this winter, mountain visitors will have access to 7,300 acres of ski terrain, 17 peaks, and a resort that extends 6.5 miles in length.

The new Quicksilver gondola is proceeding on schedule and will be operational for the 2015-2016 season. Vail Resorts settled on the name "Quicksilver" because it denotes Park City's mining history and the speed of the 8-person, state-of-the-art conveyance, which transports riders from the base of Silverlode to the Flatiron Lift via Pinecone Ridge in just 8 minutes.

The restaurant formerly known as Snow Hut, has been re-named Miners Camp and will seat 500. Additional improvements and expansions will be made to Red Pine Lodge (capacity will be expanded by 250 seats), Summit House, and Legacy Lodge. Snow making has also been added to Iron Mountain and near the gondola.

The new consolidated resort will operate under the name, Park City. The logo was re-purposed from Canyons Resort and has the tagline, "There is only one. Park City."

 

In the News

 

Vail Releases Details of Improvement Plan

Today, Vail Resorts shared their action and improvement plan with regards to Park City Mountain Resort and Canyons Resort. The plan includes more than $50 million in improvements that will take place in just one season, making it the most ambitious ski resort improvement strategy to date. The changes will create the largest ski resort in America by combining Park City Mountain Resort and Canyons Resort. Here are some specific improvements listed in Vail's comprehensive press release:

The Interconnect Gondola. An eight-passenger, high-speed two-way gondola from the base of the existing Silverlode Lift at Park City to the Flatiron Lift at Canyons. The gondola will also have an unload at the top of Pine Cone Ridge to allow skiers and riders the opportunity to ski into Thaynes Canyons at Park City via gated ski access or to the Iron Mountain area at Canyons through new trails that will be created from Pine Cone Ridge. 

Upgrade of King Con and Motherlode Lifts at Park City. The King Con  Lift will be upgraded from a four-person to a six-person, high-speed detachable chairlift. The Motherlode Lift will be upgraded from a fixed-grip triple to a four-person, high-speed detachable chairlift. 

New Snow Hut Restaurant, Upgrades to Summit House Restaurant at Park City and Expansion of Red Pine Lodge Restaurant at Canyons. The plan calls for building a completely new Snow Hut restaurant at the base of the Silverlode Lift and next to the Park City terminal for the Interconnect Gondola, with 500 indoor seats and a top-of-the-line kitchen and culinary experience. The plan also includes an upgrade to the "scramble" area inside the Summit House restaurant to improve the flow of diners and increase seats. At Canyons, the Red Pine Restaurant will be renovated to accommodate an additional 250 indoor seats. 

Snowmaking and Other Improvements. The plan features additional snowmaking on two trails in the Iron Mountain area of Canyons which will become increasingly central ski terrain given its proximity to the Interconnect Gondola. The plan also includes almost $5 million of "catch up" maintenance and upgrades at Park City, given the lack of spending at the resort over the past few years. 

"This comprehensive capital plan for Park City and Canyons is one of the most ambitious and impactful plans undertaken at any resort in industry history, transforming the experience at both resorts and creating the largest single ski resort in the U.S. with more than 7,300 acres of skiable terrain," said Blaise Carrig, president of the mountain division for Vail Resorts. He added, "The improvements offer skiers and riders more terrain and upgraded lifts to enhance the guest experience and reduce crowding and lift lines, new and upgraded restaurants, more snowmaking and an overall ‘touching up’ of all aspects of the resorts. The plan was based on feedback from guests and the local community as well as discussions with the senior operating teams at the two resorts. We look forward to continuing to work with the county and the city and are hopeful we can bring this plan to life for the 2015-2016 ski season."

 

In the News

In the News

Deer Valley Purchases Solitude

DEER VALLEY RESORT, PARK CITY, UTAH (October 3, 2014) – Deer Valley Resort has entered into an agreement to purchase Solitude Mountain Resort and will begin operating the resort on May 1, 2015.

“Solitude is an incredible resort and provided a huge opportunity for us to expand our offerings right here in Utah,” said Bob Wheaton, president and general manager of Deer Valley Resort. “Solitude is in unique position with their widely varied terrain that attracts both local and destination skiers. We are ecstatic to be able to add the resort to the Deer Valley® family.”

“The DeSeelhorst family has enjoyed being a part of Solitude’s history for almost 40 years. We are proud of what we have been able to accomplish at the resort and in our mountain community,” said Dave DeSeelhorst, owner and general manager of Solitude Mountain Resort. “We feel very fortunate for the opportunity to have worked with so many amazing people in our industry and most importantly being able to work with our incredible staff at Solitude over the years. It is exciting to pass on this unique and beautiful resort to one of the best resort operators in the country, Deer Valley.”

For the upcoming 2014-15 ski season, Solitude will operate as usual under the leadership of the DeSeelhorst family. To foster the most effective and strategic change over, select Deer Valley staff will work alongside Solitude staff during the next six months to evaluate resort operations and gain knowledge about the Solitude brand and culture. Deer Valley will then take full ownership of Solitude Mountain Resort on May 1, 2015.

 

In the News

 

Park City Mountain Resort Sells to Vail for $180. Million

September/ 2014

Powdr Corp. has sold its Park City Mountain Reosrt to Vail Reosrts, ending a tumultuous year for Utah’s most popular ski destination.

"Selling was the last thing we wanted to do, and while we believe the law around this issue should be changed, a protracted legal battle is not in line with our core value to be good stewards of the resort communities in which we operate," Powdr CEO John Cumming said in a statement. "A sale was the only way to provide long-term certainty for PCMR employees and the Park City community. My family and I are extremely grateful to have had the opportunity to play a role in making PCMR what it is today, and we deeply appreciate the dedicated employees and all of the people who have supported us over the years."

The deal requires Vail Resorts to retain Park City Mountain Resort employees.

Powdr owned the Utah resort for more than 20 years, growing it into one of the most popular ski areas in North America.

According to Vail's Press Releases, with the acquisition, all aspects of the previously disclosed litigation with respect to PCMR have been settled and this dispute will no longer pose any future threat to disrupt the operation of the resort.

"First and foremost, we are very pleased to bring a permanent end to this dispute and provide assurance to the guests and employees of PCMR, and to everyone in the Park City community, that they no longer have to worry about any disruption to the operation of the Resort. This has been a difficult period for everyone involved and I commend John Cumming and Powdr Corp. for helping to find a solution to this situation," said Rob Katz, chairman and chief executive officer of Vail Resorts.

"Park City Mountain Resort is one of the most spectacular mountain resorts and iconic brands in the ski industry and I am proud to have the resort become a part of Vail Resorts. The acquisition will allow us to immediately bring Park City Mountain Resort onto the Epic Pass, which will now offer skiers from across the country and around the world access to 22 resorts. We look forward to working collaboratively with the entire Park City community, as well as city and county officials, as we chart the future for the resort, including how we can best bring the Canyons and Park City ski experiences together to create the largest mountain resort in the United States," he added.  

Mountain operations of PCMR and Canyons will remain separate for the 2014-2015 ski season. However, the Epic Pass and Epic Local Pass will be valid at PCMR. All PCMR passes for the 2014-2015 ski season will continue to be honored and can be exchanged or upgraded for a season pass that will also be valid at Canyons. The majority of all lift tickets sold at either resort will be valid at both PCMR and Canyons.

 

Canyons in the News

Patrick Meek:
Ultimate Weekender, 
HHonors Team Member and Sponsored U.S. Olympic Athlete

Speed skater Patrick Meek, is not only an U.S. Olympic hopeful but a team member at the Waldorf Astoria Park City. He hasn't taken much time off the ice recently in his preparations for the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games and the Waldorf Astoria Park City has worked around Patrick's speed skating schedule to help make his Olympic dreams come true.

 

Canyons Golf Course making headway

 Completion expected by September 2014
 Aaron Osowski, The Park Record

  

 

 

 

It has been a much-delayed project through a development process that occurred over a decade ago, but at long last completion of the Canyons Resort Golf Course is expected in less than a year's time.

The 6,256-yard, par-70 course designed by Gene Bates and the Bates Golf Design Group will feature over 1,000 feet of elevation change. According to Guicho Pons, Officer with TCFC Finance Co., the course is expected to be completed by Sept. 30, 2014.

"[The course] was part of the original SPA (Specially Planned Area) agreement in 1999 and for whatever reason it was never done," Pons said. "We started construction in June and made really good progress over the last five months."

MVC Construction and Landscapes Unlimited have been contracted in the construction of the course and Pons said that "substantial progress" has been made on 14 holes with rough grading complete on the remaining four holes. Several holes are "virtually completed," he added, except for tees and greens, as the window for seeding closed.

TCFC Finance Spokesperson Todd Burnette said that, since they had to work with predetermined terrain in designing the course, there were challenges involved in construction.

"The challenges in building the course will end up being interesting features for players," Burnette said. "Elevation changes and elevated tees will provide incredible views from the Uinta Mountains to Old Town and all three ski areas."

Pons said they are almost finished with the irrigation systems on 14 holes. There are no irrigation systems on the rough graded holes and the course will utilize what they call a "fertigation" system which allows fertilizer to be applied directly through the irrigation system.

The irrigation system will also feature a computer system that can accommodate different "micro-climates" for the various holes. Pons said that, for instance, the holes on Willow Drop have a different micro-climate than holes near State Road 224.

Burnette calls the course "very unique" and said it has the ability to be a strong driver of out-of-state tourism during the summer, especially for corporate groups.

"There really hasn't been a golf course set up [in the area] to take advantage of large corporate groups," Burnette said.

Dave Dubois, a resident of Sun Peak and president of the Sun Peak Homeowners Association, said he and other residents near Canyons Resort are excited about the completion of the course's construction.

"We're all looking forward to having it completed. The holes look great and the paths seem first-rate," Dubois said.

Dubois did note that those residents near some of the construction have complained of dust being blown by their houses on windy days, so the establishment of green grass will be welcomed by many.

Pons said the course, which has an expected total cost of $25 million, has not received many complaints. The only notable complaints have been related to the rock cuts that have taken place on the hill near the Miners Club and Fairway Springs.

"We tried to minimize the environmental impact of the course. People complain about the rock cuts but don't realize that all of that material that came out was used in the golf course," Pons said.

Crews also employed a rock crushing machine that crushed material to be used as topsoil for holes farther down the hill, Pons said, which minimized the hauling of enormous amounts of material up and down the hill.

"The main thing to note is that we've listened to all of the residents' concerns and addressed [them]," Burnette said. "The vast majority of property owners are looking at this as a very positive thing."

For photos and information about the Canyons Golf Course, visit canyonsresortgolfcourse.com.